Establishing Rituals for Children: Nature Walks

In my last post, I pondered the idea of establishing rituals to help create a peaceful and relaxed environment for children. I didn’t want the prospect of these rituals to be daunting or forced so taking a nature walk seemed like a good place to start! Simple, enjoyable, achievable.

I like to consider the following 5 points to ensure our outings are pleasant, engaging and meaningful.

1. Slow it Down

If we’re trying to create a positive experience for children then rushing them along unnecessarily isn’t in the spirit of what establishing a meaningful ritual is all about. I always encourage my little ones to be energetic and run like the wind… if that’s what they want to do, but I also highlight the importance of enjoying the quiet and finding ways to be still occasionally.

I always plan for fifteen minutes of getting ready to walk and an hour of actual walking and exploring. This gives us time to discuss what we might see or do as well as giving everyone a chance to feel excited before it has even happened. There is no rushing. It will happen because I’ve allowed for that window of time. Our slower pace means we can take it all in and enjoy the fact that we’re out and about.

2. Be Flexible

For us, a morning walk seems to work best. The time of day is important, especially when considering the smallest of humans and their needs. After a few test runs I’ve decided that mornings are when everyone tends to be happy and enthusiastic. Very few meltdowns happen at this time!

However, I always make room for the unplanned [insert toddler tantrums here] and because I want these experiences to be joyful, taking a screaming toddler along (because we must stick to our ritual!!) just doesn’t cut it with me. So sometimes they just don’t happen… and that’s okay.

3. Predictability and Adventure

Another important factor for me is creating some form of predictably without making it feel like Ground Hog Day. We’ve gently eased into our walks and added new parts on a monthly basis to ensure everyone feels safe and secure. Sometimes we might take a different path or go the long way around but by keeping the setting the same or at least similar, means the children know what to expect.

Having said that, we still have our fair share of adventures along the way! I always support age appropriate risk taking and encourage challenging activities such as balancing on rocks or climbing over logs. In doing this we’re adding a little extra excitement along the way.

4. Find Somewhere Beautiful

We’re so lucky that our walks include a lovely bush/forrest setting found at the end of the street. Finding a beautiful space to walk through can be helpful if we want to make a simple walk with our children something more.

Using our senses when exploring the animals and plant life around us turns our walk into a beautiful, calm experience. If your daily walk is a little more urban and concrete you can still find plenty of interesting things to explore so take your time to find the best setting for everyone. Often you’ll be surprised at what you can find when you really take the time to enjoy a walk along a busy footpath!

5. Include Elements of Learning

Games, challenges and competitions are fantastic ways to engage with and learn about the environment, so I try to include a simple activity each time. I encourage everyone to be inquisitive and excited about the world around them.

Sometimes our activity involves collecting the natural resources we find along the way (so many sticks and rocks!) or capturing photos of our discoveries and adventures. We take these back with us to use for future activities or to simply revisit that moment in time and reflect.

Any activity you include throughout your day can simply be routine, being the thing you do to get from A to B. Of course, sometimes that’s necessary but I invite you to take one of those simple tasks and turn it into something more. Engage in purposeful activities together and take the time to enjoy what you’re doing along the way.

Make it meaningful.

Bree x

Daily Rituals for Happy Children

Working with young children means I can be up against some BIG emotions. As an educator I know this will happen from time to time (usually on a daily basis!) and I value the importance of supporting, guiding and comforting children during these moments. Sometimes it can be incredibly challenging to stay calm and figure out what will help diffuse the situation as well as what might help to support them later on.

I regularly ask myself… What will help to guide me through this hurricane of childhood emotion?! and; What will help them to find the calm before (and after!) the storm?

It’s all about the vibe…

Aside from the layout and aesthetics of a child friendly space it’s important to consider the ‘feeling’ or ‘vibe’ of the environment and this needs to come from us. I think our personalities, belief systems, expectations and values help to set the tone for the environment so if we continually feel rushed, stressed or on edge it will filter through amongst our children. By including opportunities to ‘check in’ verbally (or non-verbally!), encouraging moments of self reflection or simply providing the space to just breathe, demonstrates that it’s okay to focus on ourselves a little and sometimes it’s nice (and healthy!) to share those feelings with others. Even the busiest of children can be supported in finding ways to be still and take the time to reflect.

Routines Vs. Rituals

In an attempt to consider the feeling of our environment my mind continually shifts toward the idea of daily rituals and how implementing them throughout the day might help to create this positive vibe I talk about. Rituals are not routines. A routine is something we do because we must, i.e wash our hands, brush our teeth, eat breakfast, etc. A ritual however, is often a symbolic activity that we carry out in the hopes of gaining something meaningful from it. Including daily rituals helps to create a calming experience that gives everyone an opportunity to come together as a group or take moments for themselves.

Implementing Daily Rituals

Consider the following things when making the decision to include child friendly rituals throughout your day or week:

  • Start slowly. It’s important to take your time at the beginning. Consider the needs of the children and how you plan to introduce it. Focus on one at a time and allow it to become a comfortable experience for everyone before introducing something new.
  • Let them happen organically. Forcing or imposing it on children defeats the purpose. Always consider the current mood or needs of everyone first and if it’s not working, try it later.
  • Be open to change. Not everything works the first time around and with younger children our own expectations and ideas might not translate well, especially for a toddler! Be patient and alter as needed.
  • Have fun! If your daily rituals start to become a chore or your children are reluctant to join in then perhaps it’s just not the right activity. Involve the children as much as possible in the planning process to ensure their voice is heard and it’s meaningful for them.

Daily rituals can be explored individually or as a group and can be included as a way of welcoming each other and the day ahead, as a chance to slow down when things seem too chaotic or as an opportunity to be just be still. In the coming weeks I’ll share the daily rituals we are beginning to include to our day and the benefits they may have for all children and yourself!

Bree x

Trust the Process…

Process based art and child led activities are a big interest of mine, I enjoy observing children’s creative processes as it tends to tell me a hell of a lot more than anything I plan for or control. So I’m steering away from the product based art and craft activities along with adult led play and learning activities in favour of experiences that invite children to have a voice and a  choice when it comes to play and creativity. How this will look will no doubt evolve and change over time and sometimes my adult input may be visible but the main aim is for the child to lead the way and for me to shut up a little more and just observe. I’m not lying, this is going to be hard!

Last week I decided to see what would happen when I placed some carefully selected craft items in front of the kids. In the past I would have selected these items with a final goal or product in mind and because of this the activity became highly adult driven. What I often found was the kids became bored, frustrated and annoyed that I was telling them what to do. So this time,although I still chose the items with a goal in my head I didn’t make it apparent to the kids.

I selected a range of green and yellow crafty pieces along with some egg carton pieces and imagined cute little turtles. Imagine how cute they would be!? So cute. BUT I kept my mouth shut, placed these items in front of the kids and watched (along with taking a million videos and photos!).


The  only time I spoke was to tell Master 1 not to paint his sister because she didn’t like it, as well as asking the odd question to encourage creative thinking and problem solving…

“How could you attach that?”

“What might that piece become?”

“What will you do next?”

In my mind I knew what I wanted those pom poms to be along with the best way to attach the pipe cleaners but it wasn’t for me to dictate or control!

It was interesting to note that initially Miss 4 wanted to make a turtle (hurrah!) but as she began to give the turtle hair (um… turtles don’t have hair, but okay!) by adding a pom pom she changed her mind and decided it looked more like an alien and as her approach changed she became incredibly excited by what she was making. Master 1 was just pleased to be making a mess but as I watched him a little closer I noticed how he was figuring out ways to keep the sequins on the carton as well as practising his fine motor skills by pulling off pieces of Blu(green?!)tack and rolling them into balls before flinging them on the ground. Imagine if I tried to take over!? I would have been met with tears, tantrums and paint in my hair…


Messy fun!

Placing our trust in children tells them that we value and respect their opinions and ideas and I really believe that this allows them to become more empowered, engaged and motivated learners. By continually dictating the ‘best’ way tells them that without our help they’re likely to fail and it’s this adult driven approach that may result in children becoming dependent, frustrated and worried individuals. So I think the big lesson here is that sometimes we just need to sit back a little more and trust that our little ones know what they’re doing (most of the time! Master 1 defintely shouldn’t eat the paint!) and as hard as it can be it’s often worth it for their response and the final result!

Little Alien (so much better than my cute turtle idea!)

I’m really pleased with this little experiment of mine. Not only did my preschooler come up with a rad little alien that is way cooler than any turtle I could make but it allowed me to really see what my children can do. If I continually held the paintbrush, stuck on the eyes and said things like “No…” and “You need to…” I wouldn’t have observed some amazing little successes that they figured out all on their own and now we have some truly lovely little green art pieces that proudly sit in our kitchen!

What do you think of Process based and child led activities?